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Mini Dragon Group (ages 6-7)

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Radioactive But I'm Waking Up (full Version) =LINK=



"Radioactive" was written by Imagine Dragons and producer Alex Da Kid.[8] It is one of the more electronically influenced tracks on Night Visions as well as one of the darkest, similar to fourth track "Demons". The song is an electronic rock and alternative rock song with elements of dubstep.[9][10] The song's lyrics speak of apocalyptic themes: 'I'm waking up to ash and dust' and 'This is it, the apocalypse'. Though the band has publicly maintained its secularity, NPR music critic Ann Powers has opined that the song features strong "religious or spiritual imagery", the likes of which have been common throughout the history of rock music.[11]




Radioactive but I'm Waking Up (full version)



"Radioactive, to me, it's very masculine, powerful-sounding song, and the lyrics behind it, there's a lot of personal story behind it, but generally speaking, it's a song about having an awakening; kind of waking up one day and deciding to do something new, and see life in a fresh way,"


Though the channel was created in 2016, the channel's first video would not be uploaded until late 2017, over one year after the channel's creation.The channel's first video was uploaded in October 2017. However, that video was taken down soon after for violating one of YouTube's policies. Snidbert's second (and first currently viewable) video was uploaded two months later. Since then, Snidbert has uploaded meme videos on a semi-regular basis. The channel's first big hit was a nearly eleven-hour video entitled "Yakko's World but read the description," which was uploading in March 2018 but received hundreds of thousands of views in the later half of 2019. The aforementioned "Radioactive" remix, uploaded in December 2019, accrued nearly 4.6 million views in March 2021, and currently has 5.8 million views, roughly half of the channel's total view count. The disproportionate success of this video has led many commenters to comment "I'm waking up" on unrelated videos on the channel.


Radioactive iodine enters your bloodstream and is taken up by any thyroid- like cells. The radioactivity destroys the cancer cells. The radioactive iodine gives off radiation nearby and destroys the cancer cells over time.


Some of the radioactive iodine will be taken up by your thyroid cells, but there will be some left over. Most of the extra radioactive iodine will leave your body through your urine (pee), and smaller amounts will leave your body in your saliva (spit), sweat, and bowel movements (poop).


Since she left, Rym allowed herself to move into anonymity. But there was always something about her, where people would focus on her. The more she hid in reading, the more visible she became. Quite ironic: the people most not wanting to be seen are almost sure to be found. Recently, Rym noticed a hardening in herself. This emotional hardening had become impossible to ignore, with anxiety and frustration coming quicker, tiredness gaining momentum, general irritation, and loss of control. It is hard to tell how much of this hardening had come due to ageing or the ongoing perseverance of racism and sexism she faces in her day-to-day life, but regardless, it had become a notable presence in her waking life.


This report analyzes 10 C.F.R. 37, a forthcoming rule promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Physical Protection of Byproduct Material. Byproduct material includes specified types of radioactive material other than uranium or plutonium. The rule regulates byproduct material of types and in quantities that could be used to make a dirty bomb.


Congress may find this analysis of interest for several reasons: Congress attaches great importance to protecting the United States against terrorist threats; the rule will affect the many industrial, research, and medical activities nationwide that use radioactive materials, thereby affecting many constituents and raising cost-benefit issues; and there is wide concern about regulation and radiation more generally.


NRC may regulate through orders or rules. Both have the effect of law. If prompt action is required, NRC may issue orders to its licensees. After 9/11, NRC issued orders to enhance radioactive material security. Orders went to licensees of irradiators having a large amount of radioactive material (2003), manufacturers and distributors of radioactive material (2004), licensees transporting radioactive materials in quantities of concern (2005), and others.


Background investigations and access control programs, setting trustworthiness and reliability (T&R) requirements for persons granted unescorted access to radioactive material in quantities of concern.


Physical protection requirements during use, requiring licensees to establish a written security program, coordinate with local law enforcement, and be able to monitor, detect, and assess theft of radioactive material.


To assess impacts of the rule, CRS interviewed 14 radiation professionals, including state regulators, university radiation safety officers, manufacturers and distributors of radioactive material, and a transportation specialist. They noted such impacts as:


Transportation security: NRC relinquishes parts of its regulatory authority to certain states. One interviewee felt the Department of Transportation, not NRC and states, should regulate transport of radioactive materials to establish uniform national requirements: when transportation requirements are set by many [state] regulators and by federal interstate commerce rules as well, compliance with transportation regulations can become very complicated.


This report analyzes 10 C.F.R. 37, a forthcoming rule promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), "Physical Protection of Byproduct Material." "Byproduct material" includes specified types of radioactive material other than uranium or plutonium. The rule regulates byproduct material of types and in quantities that could be used to make a "dirty bomb."


A "dirty bomb" or other type of radiological dispersal device (RDD, a device for dispersing radioactive material) could contaminate several square miles of densely populated or economically critical areas, such as a key port or the center of a large city. (The amount of area contaminated would depend on many factors.) The types of radioactive material most likely to be used in an RDD are widely available. While radioactive contamination from an RDD would kill few people, many experts believe, it could render an area off-limits, perhaps for many years. That, in turn, would require a massive cleanup effort, possibly including demolition and reconstruction of buildings and streets. As a result, an RDD attack could impose tens of billions of dollars of costs from economic activity forgone, societal disruption, and cleanup and remediation.


The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is one of several agencies playing a role in protecting the United States against an RDD attack. NRC is in charge of regulating civilian nuclear and other radioactive materials. In the wake of 9/11, it issued a series of orders to its licensees mandating steps to increase security of many types of radioactive materials. Orders are effective immediately, issued with little or no formal input from stakeholders, and apply only to licensees to whom they are issued. Because of these limitations, NRC has prepared a forthcoming new rule that it has developed with extensive input from stakeholders and that would apply to all licensees. This rule, 10 C.F.R. 37, is "Physical Protection of Byproduct Material." ("Byproduct material" includes specified types radioactive material other than uranium or plutonium as defined in Appendix A.) Combining features of the security orders, the rule would regulate radioactive material of the types and quantities that pose the greatest threat for use in an RDD. The rule will have broad impacts across the country and across most if not all aspects of industries that use radioactive material, including hospital and blood bank irradiators, industrial radiography equipment, massive facilities for irradiating certain foods and medical supplies, laboratory equipment for research into radiation and its effects, state regulators, and manufacturers, distributors, and transporters of radioactive sources. NRC anticipates that the rule will be published in the Federal Register in early 2013. It would be effective one to several years after publication; until then, the orders would remain in effect.


Congress may find this analysis of interest for several reasons: Congress attaches great importance to protecting the United States against terrorist threats; the rule will affect the many industrial, research, and medical activities nationwide that use radioactive materials, thereby affecting many constituents and raising cost-benefit issues; and there is wide concern about regulation and radiation more generally. This report analyzes the rule. 041b061a72


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